News

PATH RotaFlash, October 2012

On October 29, rotavirus vaccines continued their historic roll-out across Africa, as Malawi became the fourth GAVI-eligible African country to introduce the vaccines for use in the routine immunization program. Malawi has played a pivotal role in the development of rotavirus vaccines worldwide, taking part in an important study that demonstrated the vaccines' efficacy in low-resource, high-burden settings.

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PATH RotaFlash, October 2012

Existing age restrictions prevent rotavirus vaccination of many children who are most vulnerable, particularly in poor settings where children often present late for routine immunizations. According to the World Health Organization and a new study, while timely vaccination is still strongly encouraged, the age restriction should be removed in countries where disease burden is high and delays in vaccinations and deaths from rotavirus are common.

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AlertNet, October 2012

The London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene and SHARE, a sanitation and hygiene research initiative funded by the UK's Department of International Development, have co-organized a month-long exhibition on sanitation that features toilet designs, research tools, and yes, a golden poo sculpture.

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Yahoo! News, October 2012

Chelsea Clinton is promoting access to ORS and zinc in Nigera, where only 2% of children have access and where 100,000 children die of diarrhea each year. Increasing the number of children with access to ORS and zinc by 80% by 2015 would help prevent an estimated 220,000 deaths in Nigeria.

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Every Woman, Every Child, September 2012

At the UN General Assembly, members of the United Nations Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children submitted a new plan and set of recommendations to improve access to simple, lifesaving health supplies, including ORS and zinc.

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Sabin Vaccine Institute, September 2012

The world's greatest minds focused on defeating rotavirus gathered in Bangkok to share experiences, data, and motivation at overcoming the leading cause of severe childhood diarrhea.

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Christian Science Monitor, September 2012

The East Meets West Foundation tries cash awards to encourage families and communities in Vietnam and Cambodia to build latrines and hand-washing devices.

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UNICEF, September 2012

Data released by UNICEF show that the number of children under the age of 5 dying globally has dropped from nearly 12 million in 1990 to an estimated 6.9 million in 2011. Though the progress is remarkable and worth celebrating, more needs to be done in the highest burden countries where children are still dying from pneumonia and diarrhea.

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Impatient Optimists, August 2012

In June, the Vietnam National Assembly voted in favor of two decisions in support of child health. The first is to extend paid maternity leave from 4 to 6 months, making it easier for moms to follow the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendation to exclusively breastfeed their children for the first 6 months of life. Vietnam also joined a growing number of countries to ban breast milk sustitutes for children up to 24 months, aligning more closely with the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes.

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PLOS, August 2012

If the solutions to treat diarrhea and save lives are simple and cost-effective, why the lack of attention or investment? In the second article of a two-part series, Oliver Sabot of the Clinton Health Access Initiative outlines and deconstructs arguments against investing the scale-up of ORS and zinc.

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